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Healing People, Not PatientsWhat if medical encounters were meetings of two human beings, together forming a covenant to achieve healing?

Inside the Book

Take a peek inside Healing People, Not Patients to see how you figure into the message.

For People

Being sick or getting well doesn’t define you – it’s one thing among many in your life. Wouldn’t it be great if you could get healthcare that recognized that?

For Healers

You didn’t go into this line of work to be a “service provider.” You don’t hook up internet connections, you heal human beings. It’s time to reclaim that territory.

For Change

Whether you are a person struggling with an illness, or a healer struggling to help that person heal, the way things are in healthcare today doesn’t make it easy. What might the future look like?

Healers Who Listen

Come explore how you can be a part of the solution.

Blog

3,000 years of Jewish wisdom, 3,000 people seeking healing, and one nice Jewish doctor with messy, curly hair trying to use one to make sense of the other. Take two stone tablets and call me in the morning?

Kindling… (#notaChanukahpost)

Somehow, while I wasn’t paying attention…

The Kindle edition of my book is ready! Healing People, Not Patients is now available in e-book format on Amazon. If you or someone you know has gone paperless (or run out of shelf space, as I have) but wants to have a copy, now you can!

One Small Step

There’s a talmudic tradition that when a person takes their first steps in the morning, they should recite the blessing, “ha-meichin mitzadei gaver” – “who prepares a person’s steps.”[i]

Recently, I learned a new understanding of this prayer, and a new occasion on which to say it.  When one is uncertain, afraid, or overwhelmed, ha-meichin mitzadei gaver is a prayer to be shown where to place one’s feet next, to have a clear path appear.  In the traditional instance, the word gaver means “person,” but here it suggests to me gevurah, strength or fortitude.  “Blessed are you, God, who prepares a sure path, who makes my steps sturdy.”  I also think of the verb le-hitgaber, to overcome.  “Blessed are you, God, who shows me the way to overcome.”

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